Urban Landscape + Lifestyle Photography

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Cameras and brand loyalty, what’s that?

Last week, someone said that he was surprised that I wasn’t using an Olympus — I was out and about with my Fuji X100S and Nikon J1. They incorrectly pegged me as just an Olympus guy. Well I am an Olympus guy but also a Fujifilm guy a Canon guy and a Nikon guy. I don’t have a Pentax but I have no problems using them too.

I really don’t think much of brand loyalty, at least with cameras. Sure I gravitate towards Canon and Olympus because of all the lenses that I already own. There’s a considerable expense to start a new system with another company. So sure, there is some level of “lock-in” but that’s different from brand loyalty.

What’s important is how the camera works. Does it fulfill my needs? If not, I’m up for trying something else.

As much as I like playing with different cameras, they’re just tools — a means to an end. And switching out cameras is not hard. They all fundamentally do the same thing. Of course, some work better than others for a certain type of shooting. Use enough cameras and you really begin to understand their strengths and shortcomings.

Canon and Nikon make great DSLRs but does that mean they make the best point and shoots or mirrorless cameras? Probably not. Fujifilm and Olympus put their strength in mirrorless because they can’t complete in DSLR market. Panasonic is pushing forward in video because that’s their remaining strength. And Sony, they just seem to be aiming in all directions and see what sticks.

My perspective on mirrorless cameras is more valuable precisely because I don’t just use one brand. I know there are limitations to Olympus. I don’t think that Fujifilm is the second coming. And while I rag on Canon from time to time, they are taking the conservative and logical approach to preserve their lucrative DSLR sales.

As for the EOS M, there ain’t no way to explain that one. ;-)

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Drink and Click: Using the Fuji X100S for party snaps at the Nikon Demo night

The Shootout, Drink and Click - Austin, Texas

The Shootout, Drink and Click – Austin, Texas

Ever go to a party and you’re the only one there with a serious camera? It’s happened to me on more than one occasion and I inevitably find it a bit uncomfortable. When I leave my self-imposed bubble of photo enthusiasts, I realize that the rest of the world isn’t as interested in photography as I am. That’s not the case when I go to Drink and Click, a socially oriented photography meet up that I attend from time to time.

I’ve talked about Drink and Click before. Every two weeks or so in Austin and in many other cities around the world, photo enthusiasts get together for some social meeting, drinking and clicking. I went to one yesterday. I met so many friends. It was a blast.

2014 Nikon Event, Drink and Click - Austin, Texas

Back in February, I helped arrange Olympus to have loaner OM-D E-M1s at Drink and Click. I ended up missing that one because of a last-minute business trip to Singapore. I wasn’t going to miss the Nikon demo last night, even though I wasn’t involved in the planning.

My camera choices for yesterday, the Fujifilm X100S and the Nikon 1 J1. I was tempted to play with the nice selection of Nikon DSLRs and point and shoots but ultimately decided to get some practice time with my newest camera, the X100S. I want to use it in a variety of conditions to get the feel of how it performs. Interestingly, at least 3 others also brought Fuji X100Ss so this niche camera has certainly found a home in this enthusiast crowd.

2014 Nikon Event, Drink and Click - Austin, Texas
2014 Nikon Event, Drink and Click - Austin, Texas

Along with the Nikon representative, Sharlie, several people from Precision Camera were on hand to help out. Nothing earth shattering, photography wise, on this post. I used the X100S to take snaps shots, and with it’s good low light performance, I was able to eek out acceptable photos in challenging light.

2014 Nikon Event, Drink and Click - Austin, Texas

Rosemary and Jerry Sullivan, the owners of Precision Camera, were there to enjoy the night. I was gratified that Jerry reads my blog and he especially likes my Haiku reviews.

The outdoor patio had pockets of light but with some really dark areas. I tested the flash on the X100S for the first time. The Fuji sports what it calls the Super Intelligent Flash System where it blends a touch of flash and the ambient light. I shot the portraits of Sharlie and the Sullivans at ISO 6400 at f2. Notice that you don’t get that “blown out look with black background” that is typical of flash photography. The camera did all this, on the fly, with no special adjustments. I did tweak the color balance in post and at ISO 6400 it did an acceptable job, I think.

Fado Interior #1 - Austin, Texas
Fado Interior #2 - Austin, Texas

We met at Fado, an Irish Pub in the warehouse district in downtown Austin. I stepped inside to see what I can capture in a typically dark pub. I’m not the steadiest shooter and that’s why I like image stabilization so much. Unfortunately on the Fujifilm X100S, I have no such technology. Surprisingly though perhaps because of the lack of mirror and the smooth leaf shutter, I’m able to shoot at 1/15th of a second.

2014 Nikon Event, Drink and Click - Austin, Texas
2014 Nikon Event, Drink and Click - Austin, Texas

Back outside, I shot more portraits, this time without flash. I really like the natural light portrait of Juan, the founder of Drink and Click, talking to Tamra who works at Precision. As good as the Fuji’s flash blending is, off axis lighting gives a more three-dimensional look. Britney, who works at Fado, was also nice enough to pose for a portrait. And though there appears to be a lot of light, I still shot this at ISO 4000 at f2. The camera did a nice job with the available light without creating terribly harsh shadows.

2014 Nikon Event, Drink and Click - Austin, Texas

Finally, here is what the patio looked like — crowded even at 9PM. There was a good turnout with lots of photographers drinking and clicking. In a scene like this, the X100S focuses at a decent speed — there is enough contrast and light even at night. The portraits in low light were a different story. To the camera’s credit, it was able to lock focus, but it was frustratingly slow. In reality focusing probably took 1 to 2 seconds, it just seemed like an eternity. In the end though, the Fuji came through and I got the shots.

Talking to another X100S owner, he really likes his camera but agreed that it takes a certain amount of patience and practice to master it.

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I took all the photographs with the Fujifilm X100S.

Make sure to click on the photographs to a see larger version. Hover over the photos to see the picture details.


SXSW Interactive: Testing the Fuji X100S and the Olympus OM-D E-M10

Street Portrait, 2014 SXSW Interactive - Austin, Texas

Street Portrait, 2014 SXSW Interactive – Austin, Texas

SXSW (South by Southwest), the large multi-week Austin extravaganza, took place a couple of weeks ago and I’m just catching up. I’m back from my California trip and I primed to talk about two new cameras that I’m testing. I recently bought Fujifilm X100S for my birthday and the OM-D E-M10 is on loan from Olympus. These two cameras don’t typically compete directly against each other in the mirrorless space, their features and target audiences are different. But it’s still fun to see how they stack up in the mirrorless pecking order.

2014 SXSW Interactive - Austin, Texas
2014 SXSW Interactive - Austin, Texas
2014 SXSW Interactive - Austin, Texas

I shot these on Sunday, the day after the heavy rainstorm that dampened the Interactive portion (web and social media) of SXSW. It was also the day after I bought the X100S — I was anxious to give it a spin. The X100S has a fixed 35mm equivalent f2 lens. The Olympus OM-D E-M10 had the new 14-42mm pancake lens attached with motorized zoom. Both cameras are roughly about the same size.

2014 SXSW Interactive - Austin, Texas
2014 SXSW Interactive - Austin, Texas
2014 SXSW Interactive - Austin, Texas

I find the Olympus extremely easy to use on many levels. You may know that I’ve used Olympus cameras for many years and the interface on the OM-D E-M10 is similar, especially compared to the their higher end cameras. The E-M10 is a tad smaller than the E-M5 but I prefer the newer camera. The subtle change in grip and the placement of the play and function 1 buttons are welcome pluses for the E-M10. This smallest OM-D also closely resembles the Pen E-P5, interface wise. For a mirrorless Olympus user, the E-M10 is quickly usable without much retraining of the muscle memory. And the camera is really fast. Focusing, shooting and reviewing photos, everything snaps into place.

2014 SXSW Interactive - Austin, Texas
2014 SXSW Interactive - Austin, Texas
2014 SXSW Interactive - Austin, Texas

Ironically, it’s this familiarity with Olympus which made me hesitant to jump into the unknown that was Fujifilm. Sure. I tested X100S for several days and I certainly captured very satisfying images but still, understandably, the camera wasn’t an extension of my brain. I had to fumble with the controls. The focusing is slow and unsure compared to the Olympus.

2014 SXSW Interactive - Austin, Texas
2014 SXSW Interactive - Austin, Texas
2014 SXSW Interactive - Austin, Texas

I found that unconsciously, I gravitated toward the Olympus. It’s like taking the path of least resistance. The only mismatch I found was my choice of lens. 14-42mm (28-84mm equivalent) focal length worked great but I found the motorized zoom of the pancake lens to be slow for my fast-moving street photography style. The lens would make for a fantastic compact travel zoom and would also work great for leisurely usage. The smooth motorized zoom will also work well for video. Of course, I could have pre-set the zoom to a focal length and use it like a prime, which would speed up operations. This is where the budget kit lens has the advantage with its fast, manually adjustable zoom.

2014 SXSW Interactive - Austin, Texas
2014 SXSW Interactive - Austin, Texas
2014 SXSW Interactive - Austin, Texas

I forced myself to use the X100S. Heck I just paid $1300 for this thing, I better get good at it and get my money’s worth.

Most of the photos on this post are from the Fuji. You can hover over the photos to find out which camera I used. Despite my apprehension, once I concentrated with the X100S, I got some satisfying photos. I shoot differently with this camera. I’m more deliberate and I have to be. The focusing is adequate but not quick. I just can’t fire off shots like I do with the Olympus. But I knew this going in — I needed to be more patient with this camera. I kept the E-M10 safely tucked in my bag, zipper closed, so that I wouldn’t be tempted by the faster camera. The reality is, despite the more leisurely pace, or perhaps because of it, I got my share of keepers. The frenetic style may have advantages but you can end up with a lot of so so images. The X100S was going to counter my natural tendency and force me to slow down.

2014 SXSW Interactive - Austin, Texas
2014 SXSW Interactive - Austin, Texas
2014 SXSW Interactive - Austin, Texas

The photos on this post are about the people — the locals and visitors that I met that Sunday. I can go on about how SXSW has become too corporate with big sponsors — dominating. But I chose to ignore that in my tour through downtown. It’s easy to get jaded at these events and I do admit that SXSW is starting to resemble the Formula One Fan Fest. Just substitute tech companies for car companies. But I shot more people than buildings and logos this year. Use a smaller mirrorless camera with a fixed lens and focus on the people. That’s the benefit of these cameras, instead of using a big DSLR with a telephoto. You become part of the scene rather than spying on it.

2014 SXSW Interactive - Austin, Texas
2014 SXSW Interactive - Austin, Texas
2014 SXSW Interactive - Austin, Texas

The Olympus E-M10 is a wonderful camera, more flexible, quick and better suited for most people. So why use the Fuji? It’s a purposeful, specialized camera for serious photographers. While its deliberate pace is not quite as slow as a film Leica with manual focus, it’s closer to that in feel, I suppose — certainly more than the typical digital camera. It requires more effort but you are rewarded with higher quality images, when you get it right.

At lower ISOs, the image quality improvement is subtle and might be missed by the uninitiated. As the light levels drop and the ISOs climb, however, the Fuji does produce a different kind of image than the Olympus. I don’t always prefer the Fuji images but I found enough cases where the frustrating quirkiness of the X100S is certainly offset by the superior photos it produces.

Stay tuned. I’ll talk more about the Fujifilm image quality and how it compares to Olympus in an upcoming post.

2014 SXSW Interactive - Austin, Texas
2014 SXSW Interactive - Austin, Texas
2014 SXSW Interactive - Austin, Texas

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I took the photographs with the Olympus OM-D E-M10 with the Olympus 14-42 pancake lens and with the Fujifilm X100S.

Make sure to click on the photographs to a see larger version. Hover over the photos to see the picture details.


Haiku Review: Canon EOS M

Canon EOS M

Tepid mirrorless
Slow focusing and homely
In the discount bin

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Another business trip and I’m only taking one camera this time

Crest Theater and its glorious neon - Sacramento, California

Crest Theater and its glorious neon – Sacramento, California

It’s been a very busy year so far and I’m off to the Sacramento yet again, for a week. I went there twice in February. I took this photo of the Crest Theater on one of those trips, something that’s typical for me. Give me color, the city, darker conditions and sprinkle in some neon and I’m happy.

As you know, I usually take at least two cameras, maybe more, on my trips. My Olympus E-PM2 setup is mostly dedicated to my urban landscapes, that’s what I used for the Crest. The other is usually for candids and street photography or whatever my newest camera is, that I’m playing with. This time I’m only bringing one camera.

March is a busy time in Austin, photographically. With SXSW (South by Southwest) and the Rodeo, there are lots of target rich photo opportunities. Despite my recent hectic schedule, I did manage to get out some and shoot. I’ve been testing two cameras during those events, the Fujifilm X100S and the Olympus OM-D E-M10. Those photos and camera comparisons are coming as soon as I can put some blog posts together.

I find the OM-D E-M10 extraordinarily easy to shoot. First, I’m very familiar with the Olympus cameras, which I own and have tested extensively. These latest cameras are also very much “perfected”, meaning any of the niggles from past models have long been addressed. I’m not saying the E-M10 is a perfect camera but I do say it’s well honed.

The X100S is a different story. Other than owning the small XF1 point and shoot, I’m new to Fuji — I’m not as familiar with its controls or its quirks. I hear the X100S is a lot less quirky than its predecessor, but there is still some strangeness. Things I need to get use to. So on this trip, I’m taking just the X100S. I need more hands on time to increase my muscle memory.

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I took the photographs with the Olympus E-PM2 with the 14mm f2.5 lens and the Panasonic wide-angle adapter.

Make sure to click on the photograph to a see larger version. Hover over the photo to see the picture details.