McFarlin Library

McFarlin Library, University of Tulsa - Tulsa, Oklahoma

McFarlin Library, University of Tulsa – Tulsa, Oklahoma

While the origins of the University of Tulsa date back to 1894, the current campus appears to have started in the late 1920s. In my two previous posts, I talked about how new the buildings look. The McFarlin Library, arguably one of the most notable campus landmarks, dates back to 1930. At 90 years old, the patina of age has added to its stately character, especially compared to the newer structures.

The library sits at the head of Deitler Commons, a green area surrounded by many of the school’s primary buildings and dormitories. Off in the distance, only three miles away, a skyline view of downtown Tulsa.

Over the years, the library has been expanded to include the tower and the underground stacks. I like how the underground extension preserves the original architecture while expanding its capacity. It’s better than some ill-advised addition that doesn’t fit the character of the original.

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2 thoughts on “McFarlin Library

  1. Nice picture! I love this type of architecture, of which we have a few examples also in Italy. It is quite typical of the beginning of the XX century, and was replaced by reinforced concrete.

    1. Thank you, Andrea. Yes, the modernest architecture though pure and maybe lower cost, does seem to have sucked the soul out of humanity.

      Italy, of course, has some wonderful older architecture. I’m sure I can shoot urban landscapes there for years quite happily. Not to mention street photography.

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