Light, Reflections and Architecture: Fullerton Bay Hotel, Singapore

Light and reflections at The Fullerton Bay Hotel - Singapore

Light and reflections at The Fullerton Bay Hotel – Singapore

I posted my first urban architecture photos from Singapore a week and half ago. I promised to dedicate a post to the Fullerton Bay Hotel, a set of buildings I found especially compelling. I didn’t stay there, but it seems like an upscale oasis. Trip Advisor ranked it #3 out all the hotels in Singapore.

Unlike the famous Marina Bay Sands and the Ritz Carlton, which are really big hotels, the Fullerton Bay seems more humanly scaled and accessible. A cluster of modern buildings makes for some wonderful architectural images — the kind, certainly, that I’m drawn to. Angles, reflections, light and the Singapore skyline as backdrop drew me in. I’m like a kid in a candy store in places like this.

The Fullerton Bay Hotel and Skyline - Singapore
The Fullerton Bay Hotel and Skyline - Singapore
The Fullerton Bay Hotel and Skyline - Singapore

As nice as the hotel is, its location within the city adds that extra dimension. I borrowed shapes from other non-hotel structures to add more interest. The round flying saucer like building, for example, is not part of the Fullerton.

Varying Textures at The Fullerton Bay Hotel - Singapore
Varying Textures at The Fullerton Bay Hotel - Singapore

Often, modern buildings are boring. They looks like cheap, simple, glass boxes — they have no soul. The Fullerton uses a mix of contemporary materials which adds texture. There is both a sense of intimacy and grandness. You get this sense of variety as you walk through their spaces.

Interior, The Fullerton Bay Hotel - Singapore
Interior, The Fullerton Bay Hotel - Singapore

The interiors are equally stunning. The lounge and restaurant have a view out to the bay. In the shot above, you can see the Marina Bay Sands Hotel and Casino out the window, which is located on the other side of the bay. It’s one of Singapore’s newest and most recognizable landmarks.

All of these photos are HDRs, three images blended together to get the maximum dynamic range and added sparkle. I used my trusty Olympus E-PM2 with the 14mm Panasonic lens plus wide-angle adapter. It gives a 22mm equivalent view. My frequent visitors will know that this is my preferred and standard setup for these kind of photos. The small camera allows me to travel lightly and quickly, but creates high quality images. I’ve gotten really fast and efficient creating these kind of photos.

Interior, The Fullerton Bay Hotel - Singapore

You may think it strange to talk about efficiency in photography but let me explain. Often times, I visit these cities on business trips and don’t have a lot of time, but I want to make as many photos as possible. I know photography is not a race but there is a time component here — I don’t have hours to set up a shot. Familiarity with the gear and doing this for a while has allowed me to see compositions and execute them quickly. I took these photos (three per image) plus more that I didn’t post, in 23 minutes. That gave me time to shoot more of the city.

Light and reflections at The Fullerton Bay Hotel - Singapore
The Fullerton Bay Hotel and Skyline - Singapore

Efficiency can only go so far, however. I wish I had more time to shoot in Singapore. It’s the kind of place that will keep me blissfully occupied for a long time. I have some more urban landscapes to share as well as day time street photography. I’ll intersperse them throughout the coming weeks.


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14 thoughts on “Light, Reflections and Architecture: Fullerton Bay Hotel, Singapore

    1. Really neat looking architecture. I didn’t have time to travel to the more residential part of Singapore. These buildings certainly look intriguing.

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