Austin’s Central Library with the Fujifilm 10-24mm

Central Public Library - Austin, Texas

Central Public Library – Austin, Texas

In yesterday’s post, I talked about the challenges I had with a new lens that I bought — the super-wide-angle Fujifilm 10-24mm f4. It’s a specialty lens, great for landscapes and architecture, except I was out of practice. I wasn’t making the compositions that really spoke to me. I was even considering returning the lens but decided to test it inside Austin’s wonderful central public library. That’s when things started to look up.

I’ve been to this library before, even doing a photo essay on it with the Olympus 9-18mm wide-angle. I knew it was a visual delight. One that would be a great match for wide-angle lenses. It turned out to be the boost of encouragement I need to tame my new Fuji super-wide-angle.

Central Public Library - Austin, Texas

The first and second photos are my favorite. Probably because of the glowing lights, the colors, and the reflections. They also show how wonderfully distortion-free the lens is at 10mm, its widest setting.

Central Public Library - Austin, Texas
Central Public Library - Austin, Texas

The Olympus 9-18mm is equivalent to an 18mm to 36mm in full frame terms. The Fuji 10-24mm is equivalent to 15mm to 36mm, considerably wider. And, while 3mm on the wide end doesn’t seem like big a difference, it is. It’s worth taking a look and comparing these photos with the ones I shot with the Olympus. While I don’t have identical framing, you can appreciate how much more of the interior the Fuji captures.

While this is obviously an architectural interior, it has the epic scale of a natural landscape. You can really appreciate its size with loads of details.

Central Public Library - Austin, Texas

I like how the red chairs match the giant art-piece. I’m sure the interior designers did this on purpose. The chairs also show the relative size of the space. The chairs look small but they are the standard adult size.

I used the perspective correction in Capture One to fix the tilt in the image. While it cut off some of the details on the sides, I made a photograph with the walls, more or less, straight up and down. It appeals to my sensibilities, especially for architecture.

Central Public Library - Austin, Texas
Central Public Library - Austin, Texas
Central Public Library - Austin, Texas

Stairs, stairs, stairs. There are a lot of stairs in the place. They become the design element as you can see. The super-wide-angle does distort, making these stairs appear longer. Distances are pushed out amplifying this already large building.

By the way, real estate agents often use wide-angle photos to make their houses and apartments to look larger. Now you know how they do it.

Central Public Library - Austin, Texas
Central Public Library - Austin, Texas

Playful places for kids. I didn’t have a close up of this in my previous photo essay. You can see that vivid red being repeated as a design element.

Central Public Library - Austin, Texas

Here’s one more that shows the crazy stairs in this generous atrium.

Central Public Library - Austin, Texas
Central Public Library - Austin, Texas

I’m wrapping up this photo essay with two “frame with a frame” photos. Where the architectural elements are used to frame views within the library.

I’m really happy with the way the Fuji 10-24mm worked in this space. So much so that it gave me renewed confidence. Yes, it’s a specialty lens but one that can do fantastic things in the right place. I decided to keep it. While the mid-range focal lengths will remain as my primary, I’m going to bust out this lens as the opportunity arises. Urban landscapes of course. But, you never know. Perhaps someday in the future, I might start shooting more natural landscapes.

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